FAMILY MEDICINE

Ohio Valley Physicians’ Family Practice is dedicated to providing the finest and most up-to-date holistic and comprehensive general medical care to our communities with our locations in Kentucky, Ohio, and West Virginia.

WALK-IN CLINIC

When you need to be seen for a minor illness or need a vaccination, stop in at one of our Walk-In Clinics where no appointment is needed.

DEDICATION - EDUCATION - INTEGRITY

That’s the philosophy of Ohio Valley Physicians and their ever expanding staff of dedicated primary care specialists. Rely on our Family Medicine experts to provide the finest and most up to date medical care.

Ohio Valley Physicians is locally owned and was established in 1999 by Dr. Stephen Shy, Sr. and Dr. Robert Hess. Through them, Ohio Valley Physicians provides area hospitals and the community with a vast array of staffing, management and medical services.

NEWS

true-cost-of-cheeseburger

Employee Appreciation Cookout with Holzer

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Ohio Valley Physicians recently hosted an employee appreciation cookout at the Gallipolis location Holzer Medical Center. The company also showed it’s appreciation for Gallia County by supporting a local 4-H project at this year’s Gallia County Junior Fair. Ohio Valley Physicians bought a steer raised by Braiden Duncan, shown below.

Gallia County Fair

More pictures from the cookout:

grill

 

sign

Food

     
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OVP Receives Three-Year CARF Accreditation

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CARF_Gold_cmyk_450px

Ohio Valley Physicians awarded Three-Year CARF Accreditation
4/18/16 — CARF International announced that Ohio Valley Physicians has been accredited for a period of three years for its Integrated Behavioral Health/Primary Care: Alcohol and Other Drugs/Addiction programs. This is the first accreditation that the international accrediting body, CARF, has awarded to Ohio Valley Physicians.

This accreditation decision represents the highest level of accreditation that can be awarded to an organization and shows the organization’s substantial conformance to the CARF standards. An organization receiving a Three-Year Accreditation has put itself through a rigorous peer review process. It has demonstrated to a team of surveyors during an on-site visit its commitment to offering programs and services that are measurable, accountable, and of the highest quality.

Ohio Valley Physicians is a For-profit organization with multiple locations. It has been providing Primary Care Services as well as drug addiction treatment in the area for several years. Ohio Valley Physicians has offices located in Gallipolis, OH, Huntington, WV, Logan, WV, Ravenswood, WV, Prestonsburg, Ky., and Martin Co., KY. Visit our website http://ohiovalleyphysicians.com for additional information on our other locations.

CARF is an independent, nonprofit accrediting body whose mission is to promote the quality, value, and optimal outcomes of services through a consultative accreditation process that centers on enhancing the lives of the persons served. Founded in 1966 as the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities, and now known as CARF International, the accrediting body establishes consumer-focused standards to help organizations measure and improve the quality of their programs and services. For more information about the accreditation process, please visit the CARF website at www.carf.org.

For additional information, contact our corporate office in Huntington WV at 304-429-1088.

     
zika

Zika Virus: Treatments and Prevention

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Written by Lori Smith BSN MSN CRNP

Last updated: Thu 2 June 2016

Zika virus is a mosquito-borne illness that is spread by the Aedesspecies of mosquito, the mosquito also responsible for the transmission of dengue and chikungunya viruses.1-3

Unlike malaria-carrying mosquitos, this species is mostly active during the day and so barrier methods such as mosquito nets are ineffective. These mosquitos can survive in both indoor and outdoor environments.1

The two known species responsible for Zika transmission are the Aedes albopictus, known as the Asian Tiger mosquito, and the Aedes aegyptispecies.2

The Zika virus was first identified in monkeys in Uganda in 1947. The first human case, however, was detected in Nigeria in 1954, and following that there have been further outbreaks in Africa, South East Asia and the Pacific Islands.

While the symptoms of Zika typically pass within the space of a week, there have been recent concerns about the virus are due to a potential link between Zika and birth defects such as microcephaly.

In light of a strongly suspected causal relationship, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared that the Zika virus outbreak constituted a Public Health Emergency of International Concern on 1 February 2016.
zika21 June 2016 update
: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued travel warnings for people traveling to areas and certain countries where Zika virus transmission is ongoing. These include:

  • Central and South America: Argentina, Belize, Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Ecuador, El Salvador, French Guiana, Guatemala, Guyana, Honduras, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Suriname, Venezuela
  • Caribbean: Aruba, Barbados, Bonaire, Curaçao, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Grenada, Guadeloupe, Haiti, Jamaica, Martinique, Puerto Rico, Saint Barthélemy, Saint Lucia, Saint Martin, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Sint Maarten, Trinidad and Tobago, US Virgin Islands
  • Oceania: American Samoa, Fiji, Kosrae (Federated States of Micronesia), Marshall Islands, New Caledonia, Papua New Guinea, Samoa, Tonga
  • North America: Mexico
  • Africa: Cape Verde.

Fast facts on Zika

Here are some key points about Zika. More detail and supporting information is in the main article.

  • Zika virus cases typically occur in tropical climates
  • Infection in the US is linked to travel to and from tropical regions
  • Symptoms of Zika virus infection can last for up to a week
  • The majority of people infected with Zika virus do not display any symptoms
  • Cases of Zika virus infection that result in hospitalization are uncommon
  • A link between maternal Zika infection and infant microcephaly is currently being investigated
  • As yet, there is not enough evidence to fully characterize the link between the two conditions
  • Zika infection can spread from a mother to a fetus during pregnancy
  • At present, there is no treatment for the virus
  • Avoiding mosquito bites is a key aspect of Zika virus prevention.

Where does Zika virus occur?
Zika virus is transmitted by the Aedes species of mosquito. This species is also responsible for the transmission of dengue.

While the majority of Zika virus cases occur in tropical regions such as Brazil, Colombia, Paraguay, Suriname, Venezuela and French Guiana, the possibility exists of mosquito infection in tropical-like climates in some cities, such as Houston and New Orleans in the US.1,2,4

Areas within the US which are of concern for potential Zika-infected mosquitos are those with wet lowlands, warmer temperatures and higher levels of poverty.2

Other countries with past or recent Zika virus infection include parts of Africa, Asia, the Americas, Oceania and the Pacific Islands.4Infection in the US is currently linked to exposure of travelers who return from other countries.1,2

Due to the fact that the species of mosquito that transmits Zika virus can be found throughout the world, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) believe it is likely that outbreaks of the disease will spread to new countries.1

WHO expects the virus to rapidly spread through the whole of the Americas and some virologists and epidemiologists also believe that Asia will be at risk.

Learn more about mosquitos and Zika.

‘Explosion’ of Dengue fever reported in Brazil

A massive rise in cases of dengue has also been reported in Brazil. This is particularly relevant because dengue is carried by the same Aedes mosquito that carries Zika.

There has been a 50% increase in dengue cases in the last 3 weeks compared with the same period in 2015, with 74,000 cases having been described between 3rd and 23rd of January.

It seems likely that the escalation in dengue mirrors that for Zika and is evidence that attempts to control the mosquito are not working. Aedes aegypti lays its eggs in standing water, and the Brazilian military has been drafted in to try and help exterminate the mosquito in these areas.

The mosquito also transmits chikungunya which, like dengue, causes marked fever and joint pains, and if the incidence of this also rises, it gives further evidence that controlling and eradication techniques for the mosquito are failing.

Could Zika be transmitted by sexual intercourse?

Dr. Helen Webberley explained to Medical News Today about another way that the virus could potentially be transmitted:

What is also of great concern is that the virus has been identified in patients who have not visited these areas and, along with the fact that Zika has been also identified in saliva, urine and semen (where it can exist for up to 2 weeks), raises the distinct possibility that Zika can be transmitted by sexual intercourse.

Although this does seem to be a rare event, it does raise the possibility that Zika can spread in any country, not just those that have the Aedes mosquito.

Some countries are now recommending that men should use condoms for up to 28 days after visiting an “at risk” area if their partners are pregnant or likely to become pregnant, if they do not develop symptoms or for 6 months if they do.

The CDC state that men with a pregnant partner who have traveled to an “at risk” area should either “abstain from sexual activity (vaginal, anal, or oral) or consistently and correctly use condoms for the duration of the pregnancy.”10

Evidence now shows that Zika infection can pass from a mother to a fetus during pregnancy.11

There is also a potential risk that the Zika virus could spread through infected blood. As a result, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) have advised people who have traveled to a region with active Zika virus transmission to defer from donating blood.12

Recent developments on Zika transmission from MNT news

Model placenta could reveal how pathogens reach an unborn child

Scientists have made headway in understanding how pathogens, such as the Zika virus, cross from the mother to the unborn child and cause birth defects, according to research published in Science Advances.

Zika virus: CDC investigating more possible cases of sexual transmission

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are investigating 14 more cases of sexual transmission of Zika virus in the US. All the potential cases involve men infecting women – including some pregnant women.

Symptoms of Zika virus

Signs and symptoms of Zika virus are vague and can last for up to a week. Diagnosis of the virus is typically confirmed with a blood test.1

Symptoms of Zika virus include:1,2

According to the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO), only 1 in 4 people infected with Zika virus develop symptoms.5 In contrast, the CDC state the figure is 1 in 5.

In the past, there have also been reports of patients developing Guillain-Barré syndrome following a Zika virus infection. Guillain-Barré syndrome is a rare but serious autoimmune disorder that affects the central nervous system.6

Infection with the Zika virus is rarely severe enough to warrant hospitalization, and it is rarer still for an individual to die as a result.6

Current research on Zika virus

A growing concern that is currently under investigation is a possible link between maternal Zika virus infection and infant microcephaly.1-5,7 Brazil in particular has seen a surge in infants born with microcephaly since October 2015, at rates that have been reported to be 10 times higher than those in previous years.7
Many people are concerned that there may be a link between maternal Zika virus infection and infant microcephaly.

These infants have been tested for Zika virus with mixed results – some positive and some negative for the virus.7 Zika virus has been confirmed to be present in two amniotic fluid samples of microcephalic babies.2,3

To date, there have been no known transmissions of the virus from mother to infant during breastfeeding.1

Other regions such as French Polynesia have seen an increase in fetal and newborn brain and spine defects over the past year.3According to PAHO, “the French Polynesia health authorities hypothesize that Zika virus infection may be associated with these abnormalities if mothers are infected with the virus during the first or second trimester of pregnancy.”3

What is microcephaly?

Microcephaly is a neurological condition where an infant’s head circumference is significantly smaller than the average size for infants of the same age. Microcephaly can lead to developmental delays in movement and speech among other complications.8

Complications of microcephaly include:

  • Dwarfism or short stature
  • Facial distortion
  • Mental retardation
  • Hyperactivity
  • Seizures.

Microcephaly is believed to be caused by both environmental and genetic factors. While there is currently no direct treatment for microcephaly, supportive therapy can assist infant development.

Learn more about microcephaly.

Recent developments on Zika and microcephaly from MNT news

Could Zika’s link to microcephaly be in the neural stem cells?

The Zika virus appears to infect a type of neural stem cell that is involved in the development of the brain’s cerebral cortex, says research published in Cell Stem Cell.

Zika virus crossed placenta in two cases of microcephaly in Brazil

A new study describes how amniotic fluid retrieved in Brazil from two pregnant women carrying fetuses diagnosed with microcephaly showed evidence of Zika virus.

Zika virus causes microcephaly and other birth defects, confirm CDC

Health officials in the US have concluded that the Zika virus causes microcephaly and other severe brain defects in babies.

Treatments for Zika virus

Currently, there is no treatment or vaccination available for Zika and no rapid tests either, although several biotech companies claim to be on the brink of providing a rapid and sensitive test for detecting either the virus or antibodies to the virus.

However, the CDC recommend the following measures for people with the virus:

  • Rest
  • Increasing fluid intake to prevent dehydration
  • Pain and fever relief with medications like acetaminophen or paracetamol.

The CDC advise against using aspirin or other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications until a diagnosis of dengue fever has been ruled out due to the risk of hemorrhage.1

Due to the concerns surrounding infant microcephaly, the CDC have advised that pregnant women who are diagnosed with Zika should be considered for the monitoring of fetal growth and anatomy every 3-4 weeks. They also recommend a referral to a health care professional who specializes in pregnancy management and either infectious disease or maternal-fetal medicine.6

Preventing Zika virus
Insect repellent can be used to reduce the risk of mosquito bites.

Since there is currently no vaccine to protect against the disease,avoiding mosquito bites is vital to preventing transmission of Zika virus.1,4

The CDC recommend using insect repellents, wearing long-sleeved garments and long pants, using window and door screens or running an air conditioner, and emptying areas with collected standing water, as this is a common environment in which mosquitos can lay their eggs.1

In some cases, mosquito bed netting may be recommended.1,4 It is recommended specifically that pregnant women traveling to countries which pose a risk for contracting Zika virus avoid mosquito bites.4,7

When choosing an insect repellent, the CDC recommend using products which contain DEETpicaridin, and IR335. Some products that contain oil of lemon eucalyptus and para-methane-diol can also provide long-lasting protection.1,4

They also recommend applying insect repellant after the application of sunscreen, treating or wearing clothes treated with permethrin and not using insect repellent under clothing. Always check the instructions for the particular brand of repellant or sunscreen for guidance on use.1,4

If you are infected with the Zika virus, it is important to avoid being bitten by mosquitos during the first week of infection; the virus can be passed by humans to mosquitos via blood, increasing the risk of spread to others.1

People traveling home from an area affected by Zika should take steps to prevent mosquito bites for 3 weeks. By taking this precaution, people can help prevent the spread of Zika to uninfected mosquitos at home.

As Zika can be transmitted via sexual contact with a male partner with the virus, the CDC recommend the use of condoms, both during and after traveling to regions affected by Zika virus.

Travel recommendations for areas affected by Zika virus transmission

Due to current reports from Brazil concerning Zika virus, the CDC have issued a level 2 travel alert (practice enhanced precautions) for people traveling to several countries affected by Zika virus transmission. As of 1 June 2016, the alert is in place for the following countries:9

  • American Samoa
  • Argentina
  • Aruba
  • Barbados
  • Belize
  • Bolivia
  • Bonaire
  • Brazil
  • Cape Verde
  • Colombia
  • Costa Rica
  • Cuba
  • Curaçao
  • Dominica
  • Dominican Republic
  • Ecuador
  • El Salvador
  • Fiji
  • French Guiana
  • Grenada
  • Guadeloupe
  • Guatemala
  • Guyana
  • Haiti
  • Honduras
  • Jamaica
  • Kosrae (Federated States of Micronesia)
  • Marshall Islands
  • Martinique
  • Mexico
  • New Caledonia
  • Nicaragua
  • Panama
  • Papua New Guinea
  • Paraguay
  • Peru
  • Puerto Rico
  • Saint Barthélemy
  • Saint Lucia
  • Saint Martin
  • Saint Vincent and the Grenadines
  • Samoa
  • Sint Maarten
  • Suriname
  • Tonga
  • Trinidad and Tobago
  • US Virgin Islands
  • Venezuela.

The Aedes mosquito is not typically found at elevations above 6,500 feet (2,000 meters). As a result, the CDC state that travelers who intend to only be at this level of elevation are unlikely to become infected with the virus from a mosquito. People flying to an area of low elevation before traveling to an area of high elevation are still at risk of transmission from mosquitos, however.13

In addition, the CDC also advise that pregnant women consider postponing travel to any of the areas mentioned above. Any who decide to travel to these regions should discuss their journey with a health care provider, as well as measures to prevent mosquito bites.

In general, you are advised to speak with your health care provider if you are planning on traveling to a country in which Zika virus is a concern, as well as if you are experiencing symptoms of Zika virus.

 

     
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Cabell-Huntington Health Department Launches Syringe Exchange

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The Health Department hosted a press conference Tuesday morning to share more information about the Harm Reduction Program, a collaborative effort involving elected officials, health professionals, private business and members of the recovery community.

Dr. Michael Kilkenny, physician director of the Cabell-Huntington Health Department, said the program will center on a syringe exchange that will allow addicts to trade in dirty syringes for clean ones at the Health Department. More than 200 cities have implemented syringe exchanges across the country. The results overwhelmingly show that the program drastically reduces the rates of communicable diseases such as hepatitis B, hepatitis C and HIV.

West Virginia leads the nation in new hepatitis B cases, a spike that began in 2010 and coincides with a decrease in illegally diverted prescription medication and an increase in heroin use. West Virginia is also second in the nation in new hepatitis C cases.

“I expect measurable improvements in less than one year,” Kilkenny said. “We’re chomping at the bit to tackle this problem.”

The syringe exchange will be offered at the Health Department on Wednesday afternoons. Kilkenny hopes to see the program eventually expand to 5 locations in Cabell County.

“It’s an unconventional strategy, but we’re dealing with an unconventional problem,” said Heather Wood, family nurse practitioner for the Health Department.

The syringe exchange will be coupled with educational materials and recovery coaches from Recovery Point of Huntington and HER Place. The recovery coaches will be on site at the health department during the hours of the syringe exchange and will provide peer support to any addict that seeks treatment.

“There are numerous benefits of a syringe exchange, but it will ultimately serve as an entry point to those seeking help,” said Matt Boggs, executive director of Recovery Point of Huntington. “I would dare to say there’s another community in West Virginia that has come together like this to battle this problem of addiction and public health crisis in our area.”

Fruth Pharmacy donated 13,500 syringes to the Health Department to start the program. The pharmacy also provides a scholarship for graduates of Recovery Point of Huntington.

     

Ohio Valley Physicians

601 20th Street, Huntington, WV, United States

Phone: (304)-781-0076 Fax: (304)-697-0555 Services Offered: Primary Care

Southern WV Primary Care Specialists

557 Main St, Logan, WV 26164

Phone: (304) 752-3435
Fax: (304) 752-3436
Services Offered: Primary Care

West Virginia Primary Care Specialists

705 Washington St, Ravenswood, WV 26164

Phone: (304) 868-6000
Fax: (304) 298-6002
Services Offered: Primary Care

Martin County After-Hours Clinic

6500 Highway 645 Inez, KY 41224

Phone: (606) 298-4000
Fax: (606) 298-4700
Services Offered: Acute Care

Ohio Valley Physicians

420 Silver Bridge Plaza Gallipolis, OH 45631

Phone: (740) 446-4600
Fax: (740) 446-2944
Services Offered: Primary Care

Eastern KY Primary Care Specialists

253 University Dr, Prestonsburg, KY 41653

Phone: (606) 889-1601
Fax: (606) 889-1603
Services Offered: Primary Care

Corporate Office

300-b 8th Street, Huntington, WV, United States

Phone: (304) 429-1088
Fax: (304) 429-3109

SERVICES

FAMILY PRACTICE

Ohio Valley Physicians’ Family Practice is dedicated to providing the finest and most up-to-date holistic and comprehensive general medical care to our communities with our locations in Kentucky, Ohio, and West Virginia.

We can assist you with all of your primary care needs providing personal, comprehensive, and continuing care for you and your family.

Walk-In Clinic

With errands to run, work to be done, and dinner to make, there’s not always time to plan an appointment and no one can plan on getting sick. When you need to be seen for a minor illness or need a vaccination, stop in at one of our Walk-In Clinics where no appointment is needed.

Flu vaccination, TB testing, Strep testing, cold/flu symptoms, upper respiratory problems, skin rashes or chicken pox, and school physicals are among the many things you can be seen for during a walk-in visit. Walk-Ins are accepted at the Inez, KY, Prestonsburg, KY, Huntington, WV, Logan, WV, and Ravenswood, WV locations.

PROVIDERS

Choosing a healthcare provider is one of the most important decisions you will make. You deserve a provider who is caring, knowledgeable, and accessible. A provider eager to take the time and go over several options; treating you as a person, not just a patient.

We pride ourselves on patient service offering a knowledgeable staff with safe and proven procedures.

We've earned a reputation based on quality service; achieved by recruiting and maintaining above standard personnel. Our founders, Dr. Stephen Shy, Sr. and Dr. Robert Hess, developed this company based on “quality and rapid service overall."

IMG_0828

D. Hayman

Ohio Valley Physicians Gallipolis - 420 Silver Bridge Plaza Gallipolis, OH 45631 - (740) 446-4600

Graduated: Graceland University - 2005

Patients Most Often Seen: Primary Care-All ages

Board Certification: American Academy of Nurse Practitioners

Specialty: Primary Care

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T. Jones, APRN-BC

Ohio Valley Physicians Huntington - 601 20th Street Huntington, WV 25703 - 304-781-0076

Graduated: Marshall University - 2005

Patients Most Often Seen: Primary Care - all ages

Board Certification: ANCC

Specialty: Family Medicine

IMG_8831

S. Justice, APRN-BC

Southern WV Primary Care Specialists - 557 Main St, Logan, WV 26164 - (304) 752-3435

Graduated: West Virginia University - 2010

Patients Most Often Seen: Primary Care - all ages

Board Certification: ANCC

Specialty: Family Medicine

M. Colvin, PA-C

West Virginia Primary Care Specialists & Eastern KY Primary Care Specialists - 705 Washington St, Ravenswood, WV 26164, 253 University Dr, Prestonsburg, KY 41653 - (304) 868-6000, (606) 889-1601

Graduated: University of Kentucky College of Health Sciences, Physician Assistant Program - 2014

Patients Most Often Seen: Primary Care - all ages

Board Certification: NCCPA

Specialty: Family Medicine

M. Cumpton, APRN-BC

West Virginia Primary Care Specialists - 705 Washington St, Ravenswood, WV 26164 - (304) 868-6000

Graduated: Walden University - 2014

Patients Most Often Seen: Primary Care - all ages

Board Certification: American Academy of Nurse Practitioners

Specialty: Family Medicine

CAREERS


At Ohio Valley Physicians progress and expansion never stop, which is why we are always looking for new people who are interested in being part of our winning team.

We post new positions regularly and our job listing may change as positions are filled.

Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP)

Location: Gallipolis/ Jackson/ Pomeroy, OH

Contact Number: careers@ohiovalleyphysicians.com

Job Description:

Ohio Valley Physicians (OVP) is actively seeking qualified and experienced Family Nurse Practicioners (FNP) to help grow Holzer Medical Center in Jackson, Gallipolis, and Pomeroy, Ohio. This is a full time permanent position for inpatient hospitalist and/or emergency department practioners in the southeastern Ohio area. 1-2 years experience preferred or new grads with emergency or critical care background.

Licensure/Certifications required:

  • Current licensure as a registered nurse in OH
  • Current licensure as a Family Nurse Practitioner in OH
  • Current certification in CPR
  • National certification in applicable area
  • Successful completion of Holzer Health System credentialing process prior to practice

Benefits & Compensation 

  • Physician-led organization
  • 20,000 annual ED visits
  • Inpatient census of 15/shift
  • Full-time (14, 12/hr shifts, 7 on/ 7 off, 7-7).
  • Full health, dental, vision, group life
  • 401K with company match

OVP is a family owned physician group practice company focused on the delivery of hospitalist and emergency department providers.  OVP’s physicians and affiliated providers practice in hospitals and other inpatient facilities. The current opportunities are provide by OVP contracted by Holzer Health Systems.

Holzer Medical Center has two hospital locations:

  • 266-bed facility at the main Gallipolis location
  • 25-bed critical access hospital in Jackson, Ohio
  • Free-standing emergency facility in Pomeroy, OH

 

Emergency Department Physician

Location: Gallipolis/ Jackson/ Pomeroy, OH

Contact Number: careers@ohiovalleyphysicians.com

Job Description:

Ohio Valley Physicians (OVP) is actively seeking qualified Emergency Medicine trained physicians to help grow our Holzer Medical Center program in Gallipolis & Jackson, Ohio.

Our Company

OVP is a family owned physician group practice company focused on the delivery of hospitalist and emergency department physicians.  OVP’s physicians and affiliated providers practice in hospitals and other inpatient facilities. The current opportunities are provide by OVP contracted by Holzer Health Systems.

Holzer Medical Center has two hospital locations:

HolzerGallipolis

  • 266-bed facility at the main Gallipolis location

Holzer Jackson

  • 25-bed critical access hospital in Jackson, Ohio

Meigs ED

  • Free-standing emergency facility in Pomeroy, OH

The main Holzer facility is located in Gallipolis, Ohio, positioned along the rolling hills of the scenic Ohio River Valley.

Our locations are geographically rich and diverse, boasting many artistic, cultural, and historic attractions. We are centrally located where a short drive can lead to metropolitan areas or to some of the best skiing and whitewater rafting in the eastern United States. Golfing, kayaking, hiking, cycling, boating, mountain biking, and hunting are just some of the most popular outdoor activities for our service areas.

 

Hospitalist

Location: Holzer Medical Center

Contact Number: careers@ohiovalleyphysicians.com

Job Description:

Ohio Valley Physicians (OVP) is actively seeking qualified Internal Medicine and Family Medicine trained physicians to help grow our Holzer Medical Center program in Gallipolis & Jackson, Ohio.

  • Our practice offers Hospitalists a supportive and rewarding inpatient practice environment.
  • Program offers outstanding specialty support along with a “Team” like approach with the ER.
  • Practice enjoys the benefits of designated rounding and admitting function providers along with PA and NP support.
  • Average sensus 15-18 per shift
  • 36 hour a day physician/mid-level coverage
  • 14 off a month, 7 on/ 7 off, 8-8
  • Full health, dental, vision, group life
  • 401K with company match

OVP is a family owned physician group practice company focused on the delivery of hospitalist and emergency department physicians.  OVP’s physicians and affiliated providers practice in hospitals and other inpatient facilities.

Holzer Medical Center has two hospital locations:

HolzerGallipolis

  • 266-bed facility at the main Gallipolis location

Holzer Jackson

  • 25-bed critical access hospital in Jackson, Ohio

The main Holzer facility is located in Gallipolis, Ohio, positioned along the rolling hills of the scenic Ohio River Valley.

 

Our locations are geographically rich and diverse, boasting many artistic, cultural, and historic attractions. We are centrally located where a short drive can lead to metropolitan areas or to some of the best skiing and whitewater rafting in the eastern United States. Golfing, kayaking, hiking, cycling, boating, mountain biking, and hunting are just some of the most popular outdoor activities for our service areas.

PATIENT PORTAL

YOUR PRIVACY

Ohio Valley Physicians (OVP) protects your confidential health information through implementation of policies and procedures of when and how your information is released and limits disclosure and sharing of your information. OVP constantly monitors and trains employees on privacy measures to comply with Privacy Rule standards.

If you suspect or know of any wrong doing by anyone at or on behalf of OVP, report your suspicions to our Corporate Office at (304) 429-1088.

PATIENT FORMS

Fax the completed form to (304) 781-0216

Patient Portal Login